Sunday, 7. November 2010  ir  
The Chinvat Bridge (Avestan Cinvatô Peretûm, “bridge of judgement” or “beam-shaped bridge”) in Zoroastrianism is the bridge which separates the world of the living...

The Chinvat Bridge (Avestan Cinvatô Peretûm, “bridge of judgement” or “beam-shaped bridge”[1]) in Zoroastrianism is the bridge which separates the world of the living from the world of the dead. All souls must cross the bridge upon death.

The Bridge’s appearance varied depending on the observer’s asha, or righteousness. As related in the text known as the Bundahishn, if a person had been wicked, the bridge would appear narrow and the demon Vizaresh would emerge[2] and drag their soul into the druj-demana (the House of Lies), a place of eternal punishment and suffering similar to the concept of Hell[3]. However, if a person’s good thoughts, words and deeds in life were many, the bridge would be wide enough to cross, and the Daena, a spirit representing revelation, would appear and lead the soul into the House of Song. Those souls that successfully cross the bridge are united with Ahura Mazda. Often, the Chinvat Bridge is identified with the rainbow, or with the Milky Way galaxy, such as in Professor C.P. Tiele’s “History of Religion “. [4] However, other scholars such as C.F. Keary and Ferdinand Justi disagree with this interpretation, citing descriptions of the Chinvat Bridge as straight upward, rather than curvilinear.

Three divinities were thought to be guardians of the Chinvat Bridge: Sraosha (Obedience), Mithra (Covenant) and Rashnu (Justice).[7]

Alternate names for this bridge include Chinwad, Cinvat, Chinvar or Chinavat.[8]

The concept of the Chinvat bridge is similar to that of the As-Sirāt in Islam.

Ahura Mazda

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